Changes Coming to F1 for 2019 Racing Season

carl-turnley-racing

Those who are fans of Formula One racing are well aware of one of the problems the sport faces. In most Formula One races, those who start in the first rows almost always win unless there is an accident on the track.

There are two reasons for this. Formula One teams are experts at what they do. They know how to pace out a race to make sure that nothing goes wrong from start to finish. Another problem is that it is very hard to pass and overtake on the track.

In order to make it easier for drivers to pass, and to add some more excitement to F1, there are changes being made to the setup of the cars for the 2019 racing season. These changes are in anticipation of more extensive changes that are to be implemented in the 2021 season.

For 2019, the front wings on an F1 car will be wider, and there will be fewer flaps. This is being done in order to make it more aerodynamically possible for a driver to follow another driver closely. Right now, the setup of the cars causes turbulence when in the following position. This makes it harder for drivers to maintain the position that they need to be in to take advantage of passing opportunities.

There will also be a change in the design of the front brake ducts. There are currently small wings on the brake duct assemblies. In 2019, these will no longer be used. With this redesign, the brake ducts will be more apt to serve their intended purpose of providing cooling. It is hoped that this change will also help to end the problem of blown front axles that plagued several of the racing teams such as Ferrari, Force India and Haas during the current racing season.

There will be changes in the rear wing of the cars in 2019 as well. The rear wings will be taller and wider. The design of the rear wing will be simplified. This change will increase the downforce on the vehicle. This will stop the practice of coasting that some drivers currently use to make sure that they don’t run out of fuel.

With these changes in place for the 2019 Formula One season, the racing should be more exciting. There may be more chances for drivers to make a move resulting in fewer pole to win situations.

Avoiding Common F1 Racing Mistakes

auto-racing

Formula One racing is exciting. Drivers race around the twisting and turning tracks to gain position and obtain a coveted place on the podium. Each year, there are a few new drivers in Formula One as some drivers retire and others realize that they just don’t measure up. It is important for new drivers to learn from the mistakes of others so that they have the potential for a long and successful Formula One career.

In Formula One racing, initial race position is of critical importance. The best racers on the best teams will do everything in their power to hold off drivers trying to come up from the back of the pack. Unless there is an accident or major error by a driver in the front two rows, those in the back of the pack rarely win a Formula One race.

New drivers should make sure to drive to the best of their abilities during the qualifying rounds. Any let down in performance will result in a poor starting position and few race points.

Another key for a new driver is to get the most out of the best tires for the track. Formula One drivers are required to use two different types of tires during the course of the race. One type is usually a hard tire while the other is a soft or super soft tire.

Invariably, one type of tire will perform better on a track on a given day. It is important that the driver make the most of the drive time available on the better performing tire.

A new driver to Formula One needs to make sure that all of the intangibles are working in his favor. Everything in Formula One is calculated by the team. The team engineers know just how much fuel is needed, when to make a pit stop and how the car needs to be set up for the race.

A new driver needs to make sure to listen to the team at all times. It’s vital that a driver get in for pit stops when they’re called by the team. Any mistake can cost position and points.

Finally, a new driver should review as much film as possible of previous races on a track. This is the next best thing to on track experience. Seeing how great drivers of the past raced is an important learning experience.

Debunking halo device myths

carl-turnley-halo

Formula One (F1) Racing has been going through some big changes lately including the changing of their historic logo to the addition of a safety guard on the cars above the driver’s heads known as “the halo”. This has led many to begin passing around some myths about the sport that couldn’t be further from the truth. So what are these myths and what is the truth? The myths are as follows:

  • The Halo Device Goes Against The Rich History Of F1 Racing
  • It Will Permanently Destroy The Aesthetics Of The F1 Cars
  • The Halo Device Could End Up Trapping Drivers After A Wreck

The Halo Device Goes Against The Rich History Of F1 Racing

F1 racing fans are proud of the rich history of the sport. F1 racing represents the very best in both driving and engineering that the world has to offer. This is one of the biggest reasons that they seem to be so against the change in the design of the car. Although there has always been an element of danger in the sport, there is nothing more important than the safety of the drivers. This has been reiterated year after year as additional safety measures are taken so that fans can enjoy the sport while minimizing the risk of injury to drivers.

It Will Permanently Destroy The Aesthetics Of The F1 Cars

This myth is based on the misconception that the halo will remain in its current form for eternity. In fact, F1 racing officials are actually very open to the idea of racing teams designing their own halo guard systems and presenting them to a committee for consideration. The only caveat to this is that all teams would have to be given access to the designs so as to not give one team an unfair advantage over another.

The Halo Device Could End Up Trapping Drivers After A Wreck

While this is a very valid concern, all tests indicate that the halo device would actually aid drivers in getting out of the car easier if it were to flip onto its roof during a race. This is because the halo will keep the nose of the vehicle up higher thus allowing more room for a driver to escape before emergency responders arrive.

Keeping Auto Racing Relevant

Auto racing has evolved from its roots of loud cars circling dirt tracks in the Deep South to what it is today — a multibillion dollar industry with fans from across society.

Just how can racing adapt even as new series or track seems to be popping up virtually everywhere, especially at a time when people have shorter attention spans and more choices of how and where to spend their entertainment dollars?

Race cars are sleeker and more technologically advanced than they ever have been. Drivers are stronger, more physically fit and better trained. And, the sport itself is more competitive than it ever has been, with more and more races being decided on the final lap.

Even with all that said, some of the luster has worn off of the sport. Safety advances, while always a good thing, have lessened the likelihood of spectacular crashes on the racetrack. And, let’s face it, many trackside spectators and at-home viewers wanted to see those crashes just for the excitement they add to the race. Race rules themselves have also changed to ensure greater parity among teams by slowing cars down rather than speeding them up.

One way to get that luster back and people watching auto racing is to bring the experience to them where they are and when they want it via live streaming, video on demand, 30-minute videos of the race or even a five minute highlight reel. Many teams and drivers are also active on social media, regularly interacting with fans with behind the scenes videos and responding to questions online.

Many racing promoters also understand that anyone who is able to drive can race, meaning that racing schools and amateur races are available virtually everywhere and serve to attract people to the sport.

Another way to bring spectators back to the track is to give people more bang for their buck. Pre-race festivities now include concerts and other entertainment, including additional races before the main event to keep fans engaged.

No matter how racing adapts, one thing is certain: There will always be a market for the sport because people are always going to care about driving. There is something almost primal about seeing who is faster and will capture the checkered flag on the final lap.

Juan Manuel Fangio: The Best Formula One Driver of All Time

Over the decades, Formula One and racing fans in general have deemed various professional drivers as the best for one reason or another. However, researchers from the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom used a more scientific approach in determining the best of the best. By implementing a statistical analysis system, the group deemed Argentinian Juan Manuel Fangio the best Formula One driver to date. juan-manuel-fangio

The “gentleman racer” drove during the 1950s. During his career, Fangio won 24 out of 51 races. He also gained five world championships and had four different teams during that time. On the other hand, German Michael Schumacher won 91 times and had seven world championships under his belt. Yet, he was only ranked eight according to the analysis. Ayrton Senna and Lewis Hamilton both are three-time world champions. However, they too ranked lower than Fangio.

Given these findings, many may be wondering how the assessment came to the unusual conclusion. The complex study took many factors into account besides merely the driver’s ability. Other considerations included the speed driven during races, the reliability of the vehicle, weather conditions and the degree of support the driver received from his team. Comparing drivers from the 1950s to the current day also presented a challenge.

Drivers were evaluated based on their abilities alone and in combination with their team backing. However, drivers did and do not always work with the same team, which made it easier to study the drivers separately. Nevertheless, the research also demonstrated the importance of having a good team. The scientists found that teams often played a dominant role when drivers were successful. The function, capability and reliability of the driver’s car fall on the heads of the pit crew. If the car has a history of problems, drivers have a reduced chance of winning regardless of their skill.

Despite the fact that the study ranked the top 100 drivers, the list was void of female drivers. The reason is that not many women competed in Formula One races over the years. The few that have were not successful and did not have enough qualifying factors to make the list.

Five Auto TV Shows Worth Your Time

On CarlTurnley.net I often blog about my love of cars and racing–it’s a passion that I’ve held for quite some time. While I can fully recognize that not everyone shares the same love of cars that I do, if you’ve found yourself on this website, reading my autoblog, there’s a good chance that you’re interested.

Whether you love cars or simply drive one to work every day, automobiles have become a huge part of most people’s’ lives. They’re on the streets, in magazines, advertised in every other commercial, litter billboards everywhere and, of course, are on television. I’ll be the first to admit that a TV show about car might not sound exciting, but as the saying goes, don’t knock it until you try it.

  1. Counting Cars

Starting off the list is a good car show for non-car lovers to indulge in–a guilty pleasure for some people akin to watching Pawn Stars or other reality shows. The premise of Counting Cars is similar to that of American Restoration–the group restores and customizes classic cars and motorcycles. And, in typical reality-tv fashion, they argue and bicker throughout. Given the more “reality tv” aspect, many car lovers won’t be drawn to Counting Cars, but it’s great lazy TV.

  1. Fast n Loud

Coming in third in Ranker’s list of the best TV shows about cars, the show’s name speaks volumes (pun partially intended) to its content. The premise is the norm for auto shows; finding old, beat up, run down and otherwise junk cars and restoring them for a profit. A ot of the draw in this show comes from the characters and the skits they put on in each episode.

  1. Overhaulin’

A new concept on the list! Overhaulin’ is as much pure entertainment as it is a car show. The synopsis is fairly simple: the family or friends of someone who’s driving an old junker enlists the help of Overhaulin’ to “steal” the car (or have it towed by fake police, seized by repo men, etc). Then, the car is completely customized and restored and the owner of the car is surprised at the end of each episode with the return of their new car.

  1. Consumer Reports

Yes, you’re right, Consumer Reports isn’t a television show, but the long list of videos available on the YouTube channel provides more than enough video content. Consumer Reports is known for its stringent and meticulous reviews of cars with a variety of criteria to determine each year’s best buys.

  1. Top Gear

Did you expect number one to be anything else? Top Gear is a long-running English tv show that has spawned numerous spinoffs including an American version. None will completely replace the original, though. The conversational attitude about the whole series, the hosts’ hilarity and the challenges, races and specials make Top Gear a must watch.

93 Years of Le Mans

Carl Turnley Le Mans

Come 10pm on your average weekday, adults with full-time jobs, full-time responsibilities and full-time exhaustion all over the world yawn, turn off the TV and head to bed for the evening. Most of us struggle to stay awake for the end of Sunday night football or the last episode of the Walking Dead.

For a group of 60 individuals once every year, staying awake for 24 hours isn’t just the difference between seeing the last play of the Raiders game or not. Those people have to remain awake, vigilant, and in complete control of a two-ton vehicle hurtling around a track at approximately 200 mph for 24 hours in what will probably be the biggest race of their lives.

The 24 Hours of Le Mans is a race of not just skill and speed, but of endurance. Drivers are often chastised for not being athletes because of their relatively stationary status when competing. Finding someone who will argue that sitting in a sweltering hot car for 24 hours in the heat of June, navigating a track and maintaining pinpoint focus and clarity for such a time is not a show of athleticism should prove difficult. And while, yes, there are multiple drivers in each car that swap out periodically for safety reasons, the fact that  24 hour race is incredibly debilitating remains.

If you’re unfamiliar with the race, the name provides ample clues as to its general overarching ideas: it’s a 24-hour sports car race on a track (and some public streets, though this has changed in recent years, more on this in a bit) through Le Mans, France. The race is one of the most well-known and highly coveted races in motorsports, making up one leg of the Triple Crown.

Many rules have changed since the first Le Mans race in 1923. Originally, the track was a combination of both tracks and winding streets through the town. However, for obvious safety reasons the track has been fairly extensively modified, though it still does include stretches of public roads closed during the race.

While most cars utilize three drivers, swapping in and out in a three-way rotation, some choose instead to only use two, skirting the rules regarding driver fatigue, another modification from the early iterations of the race’s rulebook. Huge innovations in aerodynamics, engine design and construction and racing strategy have altered the way the race has played out historically.

Many people have questioned the legitimacy of why a driver is considered an athlete, citing their lack of movement and abilities to run, jump or throw a ball accurately. But if you’ve ever witnessed a driver compete, chances are you’d change your mind. Adding in the endurance of the 24 Hours of Le Mans should put to rest the case completely.

Why Millions Love IndyCar, and Why You Should Too

IndyCar isn’t Formula 1. It isn’t NASCAR. It’s not just left turns. The winners aren’t so forecasted that you can turn off your TV before the last lap is done.

IndyCar is exhilarating, it’s engaging, it’s on-the-edge-of-your-seat excitement and it’s rising in popularity once again. While there’s still a certain stigma that comes with being a racing fan, I implore that you give IndyCar racing a chance before you cast it aside as another drop in the pool of “it’s just driving, it’s not a sport and I’m not a NASCAR fan.”

 

It’s not NASCAR

People often confuse the two, but NASCAR and IndyCar racing are absolutely different in more than one way. The cars are different. The drivers are different. The strategy is immensely different. The two are both racing sports, but watching them side by side points to two very different types of races.

IndyCar is not a “contact” race so to speak–the lighter cars and different bodies mean that crashes can be more devastating and evasive maneuvers become more important. IndyCar also avoids falling into the “it’s just turning left over and over and over again” pit. While there are certainly oval tracks in IndyCar racing (the Indy 500, for instance), there are also street tracks that involve twists and turns you won’t see in NASCAR.

They’re Risking Their Bodies for This Sport

Almost every mainstream sport in United States culture are in some way dangerous to its athletes. NFL players are faced with concussion issues later in life, just to name one of a number of health issues that plague the athletes in other sports. In IndyCar, a wrong turn, a split-second missed decision or a mistake by your opponents could mean an explosive and potentially deadly crash. The athletes in control of the cars that speed around turns at speeds in excess of 200 miles per hour are risking life and limb for a sport that they love; seeing that kind of passion for something you care about makes watching them race even more inviting.

They’re Athletes With Incredible Skill

Do you watch baseball? What about football, soccer, hockey, basketball or golf? If you watch any other sport but scoff at the idea of IndyCar drivers being athletes and IndyCar not qualifying as a “sport,” you might want to reconsider.

The reason to watch IndyCar are the same reasons that you’d watch virtually any other sport in existence: the competition, the strategy, the competitors and the thrill of seeing the absolute best in the business compete on the highest stage available.

The racers you’re watching take these turns are the best of the best, they’re the only ones in the world capable of doing what they do at such a level. Seeing 30 of them do it at once, on the same track, each vying for that first place finish are competitors at heart. If you’re watching football, you’re watching it for the competition, you’re watching it in hopes that your favorite team will band together and ultimately come out on top. The same can be said for IndyCar–the team being the driver and the group of mechanics that work together to complete a race.

There’s More Strategy Than You May Think

And the strategy is a whole other ballgame, so to speak. Unlike in NASCAR and Formula 1, IndyCar features considerably more passing, more breaking, more sharp turns and, generally speaking, more strategy. Racers have to know when to make turns, when to ease up on the gas and when to execute the passes that you don’t see much of in F1 racing. And the finishes are almost always neck and neck, coming down to the wire to keep fans on the edge of their seats.

If you were unsure about IndyCar racing before, give it a chance. You won’t be disappointed.

 

It’s Almost Here! Honda NSX to Debut at Goodwood Festival of Speed in June

In a month, the Goodwood Festival of Speed will be underway. This time around, Jenson Button will be getting behind the wheel of the new Honda NSX, which is making it’s second generation debut after the first was discontinued back in 2005. Glynn Williams of Business Car Manager predicts that the NSX will soon be the envy of high rolling car-collectors, joining the ranks of the coveted Porsche 911 Turbo, Audi R8, and McLaren 540C. Honda’s latest offering has similar performance specs to these classics, and is offered at about the same price.carl-turnley-Detroit_NAIAS_2015_2016_Acura_NSX

The Honda NSX is actually made in the USA (Ohio, to be exact), by a small team of 100 people. With 573 horsepower and top speeds of 191 miles/hour, the vehicle can sprint from 0-62 in under three seconds. Even though the car’s top competitors have higher top speeds, the NSX holds an advantage with its impressive acceleration, thanks to three electric motors. The car also features four different driving modes that can affect everything from the motor to the engine noise level.

Car enthusiasts have long waited for the return of the NSX, and given what we know so far it won’t be a let down.

Honda vs. Chevy

The 100th edition of the Indy 500 is fast approaching, and two teams are already embroiled in some serious beef. In the events leading up to the big day, Chevrolet has dominated the last three, leaving no victories for Honda. To make it worse, Chevy swept the podium on the qualifying stage, and only two Honda drivers placed in the top 11. And with IndyCar’s biggest event knocking, the hopes that Honda will win it are nothing short of slim.

Honda is not taking kindly to some of Chevrolet's racing tactics.

Honda is not taking kindly to some of Chevrolet’s racing tactics.

So what happened? It comes down to this: Honda is blaming the IndyCar establishment for giving Chevy an unfair advantage; Chevrolet is taking it in stride, arguing that Honda should have been better prepared. Since 2012, Chevy has won two Indy 500’s, and Honda has won the other two. The pair of manufacturers has always been competitive, but some recent events have taken their rivalry to new heights.

In 2015, the sport began to allow aerodynamic body kits. Eager to beat out the competition, Chevy jumped at the opportunity… but there was a problem. Several drivers went airborne during the Indy 500 practice runs, and the unofficial take was that Chevrolet’s design caused the malfunctions. What happened next is the crux of the rift. IndyCar changed the rules on pole day, allowing the Chevy cars to stay on the track. Honda saw the changes as being favorable only to Chevy; the organization bowed to the expectations of a manufacturer, not vice versa. What happened next was somewhat unpredictable in hindsight— Chevy grabbed the top four spots in last year’s Indy 500.

Michael Andretti, the owner of Team Honda, is voicing his disappointment because he feels that “two classes” of car are being allowed to compete. Not only that, but the gulf will also take away from the potential for an awesome show.

What do you think?